The Biopsy

My vet called me today, having finally got the results on Tardis’ biopsy. At first she spent about five minutes explaining to me why it had taken so long to get the results and how the lab had actually finished a long time ago, but for some reason, the email got lost and  well… here we are. I was listening politely, not really caring how and why, but you know, I’ve waited almost three weeks for a result, and waiting five more minutes, seemed rather unreasonable…

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At very long last, she came to it though, and Tardis does not have sacroids. There was a few cells that may show sacroids in the early stage, but since the bald spot on Tardis’ cheek has been there for so long, (a year and a half by now, at least,) it is hardly considered “early stages,” so it pretty much ruled itself out since the test was inconclusive.

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So my answer was simply that Tardis has a chronic skin infection, which would explain how I think it got MUCH better after we did the biopsy and treated the hole we cut, with local antibiotics. I must admit, I have been snickering to myself for the last two weeks, wondering if all it took to remove whatever it was, was poking holes in it… Which was about the only thing I had not tried until now.

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(See the bald spot? I realize that some may think it is a lot of fuss over a small bald spot, and I should just leave it alone. Please don’t think I got a biopsy done on my horse because I thought she looked ugly. I had it tested, because nothing we did made it go away, and this summer it started spreading. She got two more spots like the one on her jaw, one on the other side of the face (gone now, for strange reasons,) and one on the shoulder. I had to know what was happening. My greatest fear was sacroids, and that one would magically appear in her eye one day. That is why I had a biopsy done.)

The good news is, that this SHOULD be treatable. The bad news is, she probably got it from some sort of allergic reaction…

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Which means, something set off this infection, within her and I have no clue what. Which brings me right back to, what did kill Apollon?

Apollon had a streptococcus infection the last month of his life, a rather violent one, and Tardis developed this bald spot around the same time. Apocalipse had what looked like a mild skin infection as well, around that time. Both Apocalipse, Apollon and Marble was on strong antibiotics at that time, almost two years ago, Marble with a blood infection. Tardis was pregnant and “only” developed a bald spot on her jaw line. With all else that went on, I didn’t think too much about this minor issue on her. Apocalipse and Marble recovered. Apollon and I kicked his streptococcus infection, by aid of our vet, but he died anyway, from internal bleedings.

It sounds bad, when you list it like this. It sounds like my gang of horses are never taken care of. But truth is, skin infections show up easily during winter, in Denmark, because of the massive amount of rain we always get, and sometimes it is worse than others. All you can do is make your vet rich, and treat it as soon as it is discovered. I just can’t help but wonder, what was on my pasture that winter.

What did cause Apollon’s minor arteries to rupture?

Don’t get me wrong. I am not afraid that Tardis somehow got whatever killed him, because her chronic skin infection started around the same time as he died, and that she may drop dead at any moment. That is highly unlikely.

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I am afraid though, that unravelling this bald spot on Tardis, may lead to answers I didn’t have time to uncover when Apollon crashed and burned. What if, I may find out now, what killed him? What if… I could have saved him? What if I gave up too soon?

Not knowing is the worst. It will drive me crazy for the rest of my life. I will never stop wondering.

Truth be told, it is highly unlikely as well, that whatever killed Apollon is even related to Tardis’ skin infection. I just can’t help torturing myself a little, completely unable to just accept the good news. She does not have sacroids. It is treatable, at long last. Smile, you little bastard, and thank your lucky stars.

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I will. Tardis is a wonderful pony. Just wonderful. And who knows, maybe next year, she will look as stunningly beautiful as I always knew she should, without a bald spot in her face. Fingers crossed.

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About Starstone

-Owned by horses. Writer, Photographer, Director, Musician.
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